Counting is under way in Uganda after the country voted in a poll in which President Yoweri Museveni is hoping to extend his 25 years in office.

Voting was mostly smooth but a journalist was shot when troops opened fire at an opposition politician.

Mr Museveni's former doctor, Kizza Besigye, is standing against him for the third time and has warned of protests if he is "cheated" of victory.

But Mr Museveni said Egyptian-style protests could not happen in Uganda.

Oil has recently been discovered in Uganda and one of the main issues has been how to spend the income which is set to start flowing in the coming years.

Counting is under way in Uganda after the country voted in a poll in which President Yoweri Museveni is hoping to extend his 25 years in office.

Voting was mostly smooth but a journalist was shot when troops opened fire at an opposition politician.

Mr Museveni's former doctor, Kizza Besigye, is standing against him for the third time and has warned of protests if he is "cheated" of victory.

But Mr Museveni said Egyptian-style protests could not happen in Uganda.

Oil has recently been discovered in Uganda and one of the main issues has been how to spend the income which is set to start flowing in the coming years.

Counting is under way in Uganda after the country voted in a poll in which President Yoweri Museveni is hoping to extend his 25 years in office.

Voting was mostly smooth but a journalist was shot when troops opened fire at an opposition politician.

Mr Museveni's former doctor, Kizza Besigye, is standing against him for the third time and has warned of protests if he is "cheated" of victory.

But Mr Museveni said Egyptian-style protests could not happen in Uganda.

Oil has recently been discovered in Uganda and one of the main issues has been how to spend the income which is set to start flowing in the coming years.

There is a general assertion that the Ugandan electorate is feeble when it comes to discussing real policy issues especially during political campaigns. Candidates vying for various positions normally take advantage of this inherent supposition to churn out campaign content which is less on policy issues but high on sensationalism and spot-on when it comes to posturing personality over politics. However, if the above presumption is anything to go by, then it may be somewhat inconsistent with (again) the much-peddled narrative that Ugandans have in previous elections 'voted' for those candidates who have consistently sold security as their main campaign platform.

Whatever the case may be, the truth remains, the rhetoric of previous political campaigns has been very light on real issues affecting Ugandans. I use the word 'rhetoric' precisely to stress the point that many times there is always a glaring disconnect between what is contained in candidates' manifestos and what candidates actually articulate when they get on to the campaign trail. This is partly because many of the manifestos are actually 'boardroom manifestos' – drafted and sealed by small groups of people who sit in boardrooms to write them – without necessarily drawing from any form of scientific research or studies around what affects their constituencies.

In fields such as research, those inclined to disputing given research findings will always latch on to the 'methodology'. In elections, however, it is overly becoming the question of the integrity of the 'voters register'. Since 1996, the question of how clean and credible the voters register in Uganda is has come to the fore not once or twice but several times – both from voices that take active part in the elections as voters or candidates and those that at times stand and look from a distance – the election observers. Despite the semblance of normalcy in the May 9th 1996 Presidential elections in Uganda, hundreds of voters were turned away from the polling stations across the country on account of their names missing from the voters roll – actually, the real complaint was that their names which had originally been on the 1994 Constituency Assembly (CA) voters register had been omitted from the 1996 'corrected version' of the national voters roll. The grumblings of how this could have affected the election could ostensibly be heard through the sentiments of those who ran as candidates but can also be traced in observer reports of institutions such as the National Organisation for Civic Education and Election Monitoring (NOCEM). Humble as he is, the then Chairperson of the Interim Electoral Commission, Stephen Besweri Akabway admitted the glitches in the register at that time.